Monday, May 23, 2011

Other Stuff

Not me. I wish.
I almost made a terrible mistake.

Filmmaking, as a pursuit, will never be satisfied. Ever insatiable, it will exact every last scrap of everything you have to give. I found out early on that it would be easy to sacrifice my whole soul upon the alter of film. 

I think most people who are involved in any way with this industry and art have discovered the same, whether consciously or not. But it's important to look at this truth in the face, and recognize what this medium will absorb if allowed. 

No single thing in this world deserves all of anyone. Everyone ought to be divided, perhaps not evenly, but severally. Family is important, and friends. Politics, and religion, and hobbies. Let's none of us forget about books, either. 

But it's easy to forget, even after coming to a conscious recognition of this stuff. I almost cancelled my membership to the Quarry (my rock climbing gym), because I figured I didn't have enough time. That would have been a terrible mistake. Yes, the hobby takes time. And, yes, I could use that time toward the hungry beast of my "career." 

And I would have been poorer for it. 

Here's the other shoe: this stuff--everything not tied directly to film--makes better artists and students. I am a better filmmaker because of my non-filmmaking passions. If all I ever did and thought about was film, then I'd have nothing to say. Aren't movies about movies kind of annoying and dumb? And boring? 

Me. Timp. Last year.
So I'll keep climbing. And reading, and spending time with my non-film student friends and family. I'll keep being an entire person.











What kinds of things round you out? What do you fill your life with when you're not filling it with film?

1 comment:

  1. YES--those movies are boring and the broader your interests and involvements are, the more material you have to illustrate through writing, film or any other art form. Glad you see the dangers of one all-consuming passion :-) Me, I bake, meet new people, spend time w/friends and family, walk by huge doggie around in beautiful places, and struggle to understand why college professors think, say, and do what they do...everything has value & meaning. It's important that we primarily look at the arts as a means of illustrating life, rather than looking at life as a resource for art.

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